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Preparing to enter the Biology Workbench

About the Tutorial

This tutorial is designed for version 3.2 of the Biology Workbench, which is the current release. For your convenience, you can print this tutorial and point your browser to the Biology Workbench. Very soon, this and other tutorials will be available in PDF format (for use with the Adobe Acrobat Reader), which facilitates quality printing of documents.

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Account Set-Up

If you have never before used the Biology Workbench, you must first register a free account. This merely serves to allocate hard disk space for the sessions that you will run. Please select the "Set-up a free account" link in the Biology Workbench window that you just opened (http://workbench.sdsc.edu/) and follow the instructions. Be assured that the username and password you provide are held in strictest confidence, and you will only be sent e-mail if you require account maintenance. If you have used the Biology Workbench previously, and already have an account, feel free to proceed.

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Suggested Web Browser

Microsoft Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox are two browsers we recommend on using. Please visit their respective sites to download the latest versions of either browser.

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Structure Viewing

PDB structures can be viewed for PDBFinder records that are returned from a database search. One way to do this is to use the Rasmol program. The Chime plugin is another option for viewing structures on Windows and Macintosh machines, and we may eventually provide a Java-based structure viewer. For molecules with PDB structures, we also provide links to the PDB Structure Explorer page for that particule molecule, and to the Protein Explorer display for that particule molecule.

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This lesson is now maintained by Johnny Tenegra.
E-mail any questions or comments.